• Avon By The Sea
  • Belmar
  • Bradley Beach
  • Brielle
  • Long Branch
  • Manasquan
  • Point Pleasant
  • Rumson
  • Sea Bright
  • Sea Girt
  • Spring Lake
  • Wall Township

Avon By The Sea

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Avon-by-the-Sea is a quaint, seaside Victorian community located on the Atlantic Ocean in Monmouth County, New Jersey. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough population was 1,901. Although many of the vacationers and locals call it Avon, the correct pronunciation is Ah-von (not Ay-von).

As of the census of 2000, there were 2,244 people, 1,043 households, and 535 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,262.9 people per square mile (2,014.9/km2). There were 1,387 housing units at an average density of 3,253.0 per square mile (1,245.4/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.15% White, 0.53% African American, 0.45% Native American, 0.89% Asian, 0.62% from other races, and 0.36% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 2.41% of the population.

As of the 2000 census, 36.5% of Avon-by-the-Sea residents were of Irish ancestry, the third-highest percentage of any municipality in the United States, and second-highest in New Jersey, among all places with more than 1,000 residents identifying their ancestry.

There were 1,043 households out of which 18.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 42.8% were married couples living together, 6.4% had a female householder with no husband present, and 48.7% were non-families. 41.1% of all households were made up of individuals and 18.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.15 and the average family size was 3.04.

In the borough the population was spread out with 18.4% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 28.7% from 25 to 44, 25.8% from 45 to 64, and 22.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 44 years. For every 100 females there were 93.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.4 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $60,192, and the median income for a family was $80,605. Males had a median income of $53,125 versus $35,857 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $41,238. About 2.3% of families and 2.7% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 4.4% of those age 65 or over.


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Belmar

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For decades, many tourists have hailed Belmar as their favorite resort along the Jersey Shore. Though Belmar has a population of about 6,000 year-round residents, that number jumps to more than 40,000 during the summer months when beach lovers of all ages flock here by the thousands. The reason? Belmar offers something for everyone!

Those seeking seaside relaxation and recreation find in Belmar a convenient, clean white beach where children build sandcastles along the breakers while their parents splash on suntan lotion and bask in the sun and cool salt-air breezes. Young people have also found Belmar‘s beaches to be a haven for meeting friends and playing volleyball, and both young and old stay fit by walking or jogging along the boardwalk all year-round.

Throughout town, visitors have their choice from a variety of fine accommodations. From the convenience of hotels to the quaintness and charm of bed and breakfast inns, Belmar‘s accommodations offer comforts to suit your individual needs. Downtown, the large business district invites shoppers to “take a stroll down Main Street” and spend their leisure hours visiting its many unique stores and shops. Here you‘ll find almost any need satisfied with a friendly smile and service. Down along Route 35 is the Belmar Marina, where a variety of party and charter fishing boats await you to board for a day out at sea, or just to come down and take a look at today‘s catch.

And if shopping and fishing builds up an appetite, many fine restaurants, coffee shops, and cafés throughout town can accommodate even the most eclectic taste. From steaks to lobster, poultry to pasta, and vegetarian, too. From Northern Italian to the Caribbean and Central America, you‘ll sample every cuisine while dining in Belmar.

Belmar‘s popularity in the summer is well known, but what makes Belmar truly special is its unique, small-town charm, and its most important treasure: its friendly people. This is why Belmar offers the best of both worlds. For three months every summer, Belmar is a vibrant, health-conscious seaside resort community. And for twelve months a year, Belmar is a wonderful community in which to live, raise a family or retire.

The Oceanfront is where you will find Taylor Pavillion and the Huisman Gazebo – The Centers for many of Belmar‘s spectacular shows and events. The Annual New Jersey Seafood Festival, the Summer Band Concert and Social Dance Series, craft shows and exhibits are just some of the activities you will find at Belmar‘s famous Oceanfront.


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Bradley Beach

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Bradley Beach is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough population was 4,298. The summer population can reach 30,000.

As of the census of 2000, there were 4,793 people, 2,297 households, and 1,086 families residing in the borough. The population density was 8,097.6 people per square mile (3,136.6/km2). There were 3,132 housing units at an average density of 5,291.4 per square mile (2,049.6/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 88.15% White, 3.86% African American, 0.17% Native American, 1.46% Asian, 0.02% Pacific Islander, 4.01% from other races, and 2.34% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 12.83% of the population.

There were 2,297 households out of which 18.3% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 32.4% were married couples living together, 10.2% had a female householder with no husband present, and 52.7% were non-families. 42.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 8.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.09 and the average family size was 2.91.

In the borough the population was spread out with 18.0% under the age of 18, 8.0% from 18 to 24, 38.6% from 25 to 44, 23.1% from 45 to 64, and 12.3% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 99.0 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 98.3 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $40,878, and the median income for a family was $49,688. Males had a median income of $37,164 versus $31,276 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,438. About 5.7% of families and 9.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 14.9% of those under age 18 and 6.3% of those age 65 or over.


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Brielle

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Brielle is bordered to the north and east by the borough of Manasquan, to the west by Wall Township and to the south by the borough of Point Pleasant Beach across the Manasquan River. Route 35 runs through the middle of the town and Route 70 runs along its western edge

The town is primarily a residential community of single homes, with a few condominiums; there are almost no undeveloped lots of land left. There are several businesses located along Union Avenue and Higgins Avenue and some marinas along the Manasquan River. It currently has one church, The Church in Brielle (formerly the Dutch Reformed Church) and several restaurants that have a liquor license, but no true bars. There is also a 140 acres (0.57 km2) 18 hole Manasquan River Golf Club.

The town has approximately 6.4 kilometers (4.0 mi) of waterfront along the Manasquan River, Glimmerglass, and Debbie’s Creek, all of which are salt water and tidal. Brielle’s borders extend to an 8-acre (32,000 m2) island in the Manasquan River. According to the United States Census Bureau, the township has a total area of 2.37 square miles (6.1 km2), of which, 1.78 square miles (4.6 km2) of it is land and 0.59 square miles (1.5 km2) of it (24.9%) is water.

As of the census of 2000, there were 4,893 people, 1,938 households, and 1,414 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,754.4 people per square mile (1,061.3/km2). There were 2,123 housing units at an average density of 1,195.1 per square mile (460.5/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 93.05% White, 3.52% African American, 0.06% Native American, 0.67% Asian, 1.61% from other races, and 1.08% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 3.31% of the population.[14] There were 1,938 households out of which 30.8% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 62.0% were married couples living together, 7.6% had a female householder with no husband present, and 27.0% were non-families. 23.5% of all households were made up of individuals and 12.0% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.00.

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 4.8% from 18 to 24, 24.8% from 25 to 44, 29.0% from 45 to 64, and 17.7% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 43 years. For every 100 females there were 91.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.8 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $178,368, and the median income for a family was $172,867. Males had a median income of $98,828 versus $72,156 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $105,785. About 2.6% of families and 3.9% of the population were below the poverty line, including 1.9% of those under age 18 and 5.4% of those age 65 or over.


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Long Branch

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While life in most New Jersey Shore communities is centered around a modest block or two of business district and a hubbub of activity during warmer times, life in the year-round City of Long Branch is too energetic, too diverse, and too full of ideas to be confined to a single “hub” and a single season.

As the largest city in Monmouth County (5 square miles), Long Branch is many places in one…a rich tapestry of cultural currents and cool breezes – from beloved “mom and pop” storefronts and old-world ethnic cafes to sophisticated nightlife and upscale shopping. If you are looking for great dining, chic boutiques, outdoor recreation, art, music, theatre, unique bars or simply state-of-the-art relaxation, you’ve come to the right place…the new Long Branch with its timeless oceanfront vistas, riverfront views and marinas, and seaside promenades.

Long Branch is also the home of Seven Presidents Park. In the summer, this 38-acre beach park is a great place to swim, sun and surf; in the off-season, a nice place for quiet walks. Everything needed to enjoy a day at the beach is readily available during the summer months: snack bar, sheltered eating areas, volleyball area, outdoor showers and changing areas, guarded swimming, designated areas for surfing. The park also offers a reservable picnic tent for groups of up to 50.

Shopping, dining, and entertainment can be experienced at Long Branch’s Pier Village, an award-winning mixed use community built in 2005. Pier Village consists of 536 rental residences sitting atop more than 100,000 square feet of retail space. A public grassy area called Festival Plaza is the site of regular events, including concerts, arts & crafts fairs, outdoor movies and holiday events. The first story of the buildings is filled with shops and restaurants, while the upper floors are filled with ocean-view apartments. There are three restaurants situated on the boardwalk facing the ocean: Avenue, Sirena and McLoones. Ofthese, only McLoone’s Pier House is free-standing – built from the ground up by the restaurateur, it was open a year in advance of the rest of the commercial properties within the Village.

There are also other areas that have been identified for redevelopment. The Broadway Arts Center is one project that had stalled due to financial/economic factors, but the new economic climate is bringing about new interest. The plan to develop the area includes adding 70 new shops and restaurants, 500 residences, and performing arts theaters.

The city also has plans to rebuild the pier that was burned by a fire in 1987. The reconstruction will include the addition of a ferry terminal, running ferries from Long Branch to NYC. If this project eventually comes to fruition, it would be the largest infrastructure project in the history of Long Branch.

Long Branch is very conducive to commuters, offering a number of different transportation options including its own train station and multiple bus stops. It’s about a 10 minute drive to the Sea Streak Ferry, a quick drive up Route 36 to the Parkway and Route 18.

Most of the oceanfront residences in Long Branch are condominium complexes and townhomes. Each complex is unique and offers varying amenities – pools, concierge service, gyms, tennis courts, recreation rooms, etc. Some allow pets, while others have strict rules against them. They each have individual rules regarding rentals. Regardless of your needs, Long Branch has something to offer!


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Manasquan

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Manasquan, located along the Atlantic Ocean at the southern end of Monmouth County, NJ, has been a settled community for nearly 125 years. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough population was 5,897.

As of the census of 2000, there were 6,310 people, 2,600 households, and 1,635 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,579.6 people per square mile (1,765.4/km2). There were 3,531 housing units at an average density of 2,562.7 per square mile (987.9/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 97.89% White, 0.41% Black, 0.11% Native American, 0.44% Asian, 0.48% from other races, and 0.67% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.48% of the population.

There were 2,600 households out of which 29.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 49.3% were married couples living together, 10.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.1% were non-families. 30.2% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.43 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.8% under the age of 18, 6.6% from 18 to 24, 29.6% from 25 to 44, 25.1% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 96.9 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 95.4 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $63,079, and the median income for a family was $73,670. Males had a median income of $52,368 versus $33,333 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $32,898. About 2.2% of families and 3.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 2.8% of those under age 18 and 5.3% of those age 65 or over.

Beaches of Manasquan

Manasquan has one mile of sandy beaches located between the Manasquan inlet to the south and Sea Girt to the North. There are separate lifeguard stations with a flag system designating swimming, rafting and surf boarding areas. In addition there is a designated fishing area at the Inlet Beach. The blacktop walk way spans 8/10’s of a mile.

Manasquan has the only beach dedicated to the handicapped in the Jersey Shore area. Elks Beach provides handicapped parking and a wooden boardwalk to a platform on the beach. In addition, there are several large handicapped chairs available for the use of the beach and the water’s edge.

At Recreation Beach, an area is set aside for volleyball, wiffleball and general games. On Tuesday evenings, a local volleyball league participates at Main Beach. All sports MUST be played on Recreation Beach.

The Inlet Beach is one of the finest surfing beaches on the east coast and many contests are held there throughout the summer. Visitors from all over the country have visited Manasquan to surf at the Inlet Beach.

At Softball Beach, A Junior Lifeguard program is sponsored by the Manasquan Beach Patrol Lifeguards and it provides instruction in water safety and essentials of life guarding to kids ages 9-16. See below for information.

Manasquan Beach has 4 municipal parking lots and is within walking distance from the train station which services the NJ Transit System. Trains from New York City and Newark run a regular schedule to Manasquan.

Food and Drinks are allowed on the beach.

No alcohol or glass allowed on the beach.


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Point Pleasant

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Point Pleasant is a Borough in Ocean County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough population was 18,392. Point Pleasant is distinct from Point Pleasant Beach, which is a separate community.

As of the census of 2000, there were 19,306 people, 7,560 households, and 5,231 families residing in the borough. The population density was 5,461.6 people per square mile (2,111.6/km2). There were 8,350 housing units at an average density of 2,362.2 per square mile (913.3/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.83% White, 5.33% African-American, Hispanic or Latino of any race were 10.41%, 0.14% Native American, 0.54% Asian, 0.01% Pacific Islander, 0.50% from other races, and 0.69% from two or more races.

There were 7,560 households out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 54.8% were married couples living together, 10.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 30.8% were non-families. 25.7% of all households were made up of individuals and 10.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.52 and the average family size was 3.06.

In the borough the population was spread out with 23.7% under the age of 18, 6.0% from 18 to 24, 30.5% from 25 to 44, 24.8% from 45 to 64, and 14.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 39 years. For every 100 females there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 89.6 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $55,987, and the median income for a family was $64,798. Males had a median income of $50,828 versus $32,886 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,715. About 2.0% of families and 3.2% of the population were below the poverty line, including 3.0% of those under age 18 and 5.2% of those age 65 or over.


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Rumson

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Rumson is perfectly situated on a picturesque peninsula overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, and bounded by the Shrewsbury and Navesink Rivers. Blessed with this unique location and natural beauty, the Rumson peninsula has remained an attractive site consisting of 5.2 square miles.

Spectacularly large homes reside on large plots of land in this very wealthy New Jersey town. Many backyards are equipped with private docks, pools, and tennis courts. Locals enjoy the beautiful beaches just over the Sea Bright Bridge, fine eating establishments, and beautiful parks. Its location is also attractive in its proximity to NYC, and easy commuting accessibility via the train or ferry.

Nearby cities and towns include Fair Haven, Highlands, Monmouth Beach, Navesink and Sea Bright. Rumson is a suburban community with a population of 7,063. The median household income in Rumson is $173,384. 71% of residents are married and families with children reside in 42% of Rumson households. Half the population of Rumson commutes 30 minutes or more to work, with 83% of residents holding white collar jobs and 17% residents holding blue collar jobs.

The median age of homes in Rumson, NJ is 48 years, with 83% of those homes owned, 8% rented and 8% not occupied.


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Sea Bright

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Sea Bright is a borough in Monmouth County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough population was 1,412.

As of the census of 2000, there were 1,818 people, 1,003 households, and 402 families residing in the borough. The population density was 2,846.9 people per square mile (1,096.8/km2). There were 1,202 housing units at an average density of 1,882.3 per square mile (725.1/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 94.39% White, 1.76% African American, 2.26% Asian, 0.88% from other races, and 0.72% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 4.51% of the population.

There were 1,003 households out of which 11.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 29.6% were married couples living together, 6.3% had a female householder with no husband present, and 59.9% were non-families. 45.4% of all households were made up of individuals and 7.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 1.81 and the average family size was 2.51.

In the borough the population was spread out with 11.2% under the age of 18, 5.3% from 18 to 24, 41.5% from 25 to 44, 31.2% from 45 to 64, and 10.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 109.7 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 109.5 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $65,563, and the median income for a family was $72,031. Males had a median income of $60,417 versus $41,100 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $45,066. About 5.3% of families and 7.6% of the population were below the poverty line, including 18.0% of those under age 18 and 3.7% of those age 65 or over.

Population in July 2009: 1,808. Population change since 2000: -0.6%

Males: 945 (52.3%)

Females: 863 (47.7%)

Median resident age: 40.2 years

New Jersey median age: 36.7 years

Estimated median household income in 2009: $77,013 (it was $65,563 in 2000)

Sea Bright: $77,013

New Jersey: $68,342

Estimated per capita income in 2009: $89,411

Sea Bright borough income, earnings, and wages data

Estimated median house or condo value in 2009: $690,394 (it was $194,500 in 2000)

Sea Bright: $690,394

New Jersey: $348,300

Mean prices in 2009: All housing units: $779,490; Detached houses: $815,520; Townhouses or other attached units: $991,462; In 2-unit structures: $792,510; In 3-to-4-unit structures: $693,799; In 5-or-more-unit structures: $426,061

Median gross rent in 2009: $1,167


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Sea Girt

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The Borough of Sea Girt, located in Monmouth Count, New Jersey, consists of a one-square mile locality between Stockton Lake and Wreck Pond with a unique history and the charm of a quiet seaside community.

Sea Girt is a beautiful community blessed with small town charm, rural beauty, and a rich community life with an abundance of recreational activities enjoyed by residents and visitors alike. The Borough of Sea Girt’s beaches and boardwalk are open on a year-round basis. The boardwalk offers a panoramic view of the Atlantic Ocean that starts at the historic Lighthouse and runs to the Southern end of the charmingly inviting town.

Sea Girt Lighthouse

The Sea Girt Lighthouse, at Ocean Avenue and Beacon Boulevard in Sea Girt, New Jersey, flashed its first light December 10, 1896. The beacon, which could be seen 15 miles at sea, guided countless mariners in their journeys and contributed to the state’s economic growth and helped make sailing through local waters safer.

The lighthouse was built to illuminate a blind spot midway in the 38½-mile stretch between Navesink Lighthouse (Twin Lights) to the north and Barnegat Lighthouse to the south. It also served as a landmark for nearby Sea Girt Inlet and Wreck Pond.

By the early 1900s, there were some 40 light stations – lighthouses, lightships and range lights – along New Jersey’s 130-mile coastline. Just over half of them survive. But only 11 of the original lighthouses, including Sea Girt, are open to the public.


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Spring Lake

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Home to more than 2 miles of the most beautiful beach on the Jersey Shore, the “Jewel of the Jersey Shore” boasts the longest non-interrupted, non-commercial boardwalk in the state. Nestled between Lake Como to the North and Sea Girt to the South, you will find Spring Lake, Lake Como, and Wreck Pond along with, of course, the Atlantic Ocean. Named after the natural springs that feed into the town’s largest lake – fresh water that drains into the Atlantic Ocean – Spring Lake is primarily residential in nature and a premier summer resort community. Spring Lake also has a top-rated school system, including 1 public (H.W. Mountz) and 1 Private (St. Catherine’s) elementary school. Spring Lake public school students go to Manasquan High School.

There is no shortage of things to do in this wonderful Victorian town. A quaint downtown area is home to wonderful shops and eateries. In addition to basking on Spring Lake’s sparkling white sands, you will also enjoy biking, fishing, boating, concerts in the park, walking/jogging the long boardwalk, seven tennis courts, the wonderful productions presented by the Spring LakeTheater, and so much more! Spring Lake has been home to the Spring Lake Five since 1977, which has since grown into New Jersey’s largest road race. History buffs can find a slew of magical history in Spring Lake, and may want to visit Spring Lake’s Centennial Clock on Third Avenue. The clock was constructed in 1992 to commemorate the borough’s 100th birthday. Beneath the plaque, there is a time capsule which contains memorabilia of 1992 Spring Lake, a video of the town, and pictures drawn by the town’s school children. The capsule will be opened in the year 2042.

For each of the past two years, the boardwalk has taken quite a beating – Irene in 2011 and Sandy in 2012 both took their toll. One of the two landmark pavilions, the North End Pavillion, was demolished and carted off in December of 2012. While plans to demolish the 80-year-old terracotta-tiled building were in the works long before the wrath of Sandy, the Superstorm did delay the demolition and subsequent rebuild in the same spot. The new design, anticipated to be complete by October 2013, will incorporate two saltwater pools and five of the original terracotta tiles and will extend 16 feet closer to Ocean Avenue, eliminating the parking spaces on the west side.

When the historic Third Avenue was laid out and graded, it was a dirt street on which horses trotted and carriages rolled. Eventually the automobile replaced the horse and in 1920, the avenue was paved. Livery stables became garages. Automobile dealerships and auto repair shops appeared. Gas pumps sprang up along the avenue. For nearly the first half of the 20th century, Third Avenue was a clearly defined line dividing two Spring Lakes. There was the Spring Lake east of Third Avenue and the Spring Lake west of Third Avenue. During the summer, the town east of Third Avenue glittered and bustled with the activities of the summer visitors – during the winter months, it was dark and empty as all the homes and hotels were boarded up for the season. The year-round residents who operated the business which supported the resort community lived west of Third Avenue. Third Avenue itself also changed with the seasons – winter saw many of the stores close because there was not a population large enough to support them. As Dr. Robert Patterson put it, “It was three months scurry and nine months worry.” After the Second World War, more people made Spring Lake their permanent home. Today, most Spring Lakers are year-round residents and Third Avenue’s businesses stay open all year.


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Wall Township

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Wall Township is a wonderful, large community, spanning approximately 31.4 square miles, with a population according to the 2010 Census Bureau of 26,164. Located on the southern end of Monmouth County, Wall Township was formally incorporated as a township by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 7, 1851.

During the turn of the 19th Century, many of the other seashore communities, including Belmar, Manasquan, Spring Lake, Sea Girt, Brielle, South Belmar (now Lake Como), and Spring Lake Heights, seceded from Wall to form their own municipalities. Wall Township now includes land from the Shark River to the Manasquan River, as well as land from Belmar to Howell.

Wall’s location makes it a very attractive place to live. There are homes on the river if you want a water view, or wish for a place to dock your boat. It’s only a short distance to beautiful area beaches, and its Bike Trail takes you right through to Manasquan.

Easy access to the Garden State Parkway, Highways 71, 35, and 34, as well as Highway 138 connecting to Interstate 195, and Route 18. Additionally, mass transit such as buses, trains, and ferries makes it very easy for commuters. Corporate jets from Allaire Airport fly over tree-edged open spaces dotted with industries, businesses, clusters of homes, tilled farms and stable lands.

Wall’s proximity to area beaches, Shark River, Allaire State Park, and farmland make the township an ideal place for outdoor activities. Horseback riding, boating, surfing, fishing, golf, camping, running, biking, swimming, tennis, basketball, soccer…and the list goes on. Wall Township even boasts its own 1/3 of a mile paved oval Speedway, Wall Stadium Speedway, one of the most successful stock car racing short tracks in the Country.


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